The bolus-basal insulin injection regime for those living with diabetes works like your body should, but may not be a suitable fit for everyone.

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If you have insulin dependent diabetes, you’re very familiar with bolus insulin, the type of insulin that is short-acting, typically taken with meals. However, not as many people with diabetes are as familiar with the other kind, basal insulin or, for that matter,  the bolus-basal insulin regime. Read on to learn the difference between bolus and basal injections and why a bolus-basal routine might be right for you.

Continue Reading Bolus and Basal Injections and What You Need to Know

Fewer cases of diabetes are being reported in recent years. However, the epidemic is not over!!

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The number of new diabetes cases being reported has declined for the fifth year straight. After decades of increases, this is a positive sign according to health care professionals. In 2014, 1.4 million people were diagnosed with diabetes, which is down from 1.7 million new cases reported in 2009. While the statistics are great news, they don’t mean the epidemic has ended.

Continue Reading Fewer People Are Being Diagnosed with Diabetes

It’s important to know what medications are safe to take when you have a cold or allergy symptoms if you’re a diabetes sufferer. Here are some tips.

cold or allergy

Cold and allergy season is here again! As someone with diabetes, careful consideration should be made before taking any over-the-counter medications for your cold or allergy. When you’re sick, your glucose levels are already affected, so it’s best to avoid certain medications that may make it worse.

Continue Reading Diabetes Tips for Cold and Allergy Season

Living with diabetes doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy your favorite holiday foods. There are plenty of diabetes friendly recipes if you want to enjoy a LATE or a VERY EARLY St. Patrick’s Day this year!

st patricks dayBetter late than never………Holiday’s celebrated with friends, family and special foods don’t have to be a problem if you suffer from diabetes. St. Patrick’s Day is a perfect example of when eating some holiday-inspired dishes can make for a special occasion. Here are some diabetes friendly recipes for celebrating “the wearing of the green!”

Continue Reading Diabetes Friendly Recipes for NEXT St. Patrick’s Day!!

Candy gifts on Valentine’s Day may not be best choice for a loved one with diabetes. Here are some ideas on what to give instead.

 valentines day

Stores have been stocked for weeks in anticipation of Valentine’s Day. With this holiday right around the corner, you may be struggling to find the perfect gift if your loved one suffers from diabetes. The majority of store shelves are probably stocked with gifts of sugary sweets – a nightmare for those trying to control their blood sugar! So what’s a person to do? Try some of these suggestions instead!

Portion Control

First of all, put one myth aside. In many cases, a small amount of sugar isn’t going to be deadly to your beloved diabetes sufferer. This means you don’t have to completely avoid it. Of course, it’s best to look for sugar-free version of sweets as an alternative. But there are other options. Dark chocolates have less sugar than milk chocolate, for one. And remember, chocolate isn’t the only food that has sugar. Carbohydrates also can be an issue, so pay attention to them as well.

Give with Goodwill

If you want to give someone a gift, do so with good intentions and not with a lecture. If your loved one struggles with diabetes, he or she knows what works for their body. They may decide not to eat a sugary gift but that’s their decision to make. They don’t need you to give them advice. You also don’t need to make excuses if you choose a gift that isn’t food related. For example, saying something like, “I was going to get you a chocolate heart but I know that’s not good for you.” Don’t lecture or play parent.

Gifts that Can Be Problematic

If you want to avoid giving a gift that may cause problems, avoid;

  • Chocolates
  • Sugary treats
  • Carbohydrates
  • Fruit – both fresh and dry

Better Gift Ideas

Instead of going with the obvious Valentine’s Day gifts why not consider something completely different? Gifts like;

  • Non-edible, non-food gifts
  • Nuts
  • Artificially sweetened treats
  • Experiences – gifts that are something to do instead of just a “thing”.

You can still show with sweetness how much you care this Valentine’s Day without making it awkward for loved ones who struggle with diabetes.

Focus Express Mail Pharmacy has been helping people manage their diabetes for years. We can answer your questions about diabetes, insulin pumps, glucose testing supplies, and more. Call us today at 1-866-403-6287.

 

A new year brings new developments in diabetes care, and tech improvements in insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitoring systems.

 New Year

The New Year means we can expect new developments in diabetes care and treatment. And this year promises some exciting and innovative diabetes products, including new, more technologically advanced insulin pumps and improvements in continuous glucose monitoring systems.

Here is what is on the horizon for diabetes care in 2016:

Insulin Pumps

Advances in insulin pumps in the coming year will include making the pumps thinner and easier to use, and having them function more like smartphones. Insulet is developing a next generation controller for their patch insulin pump, the Phoenix EDM, which will be thinner and have a touchscreen interface. A new version of the Medtronic Minimed Insulin Pump is also expected that will add predictive LGS capabilities as well as a new user interface and buttons.

Blood Glucose  Monitors

Exciting changes are also being made to diabetes monitors. The Abbot Freestyle Libra, expected to be released this year, will employ a first-of-its-kind factory-calibrated flash system to allow users to scan a sensor and display a reading at any time.

Dexcom is also expected to release a new version of their monitor in 2016. It’s still not known all the new features the G6 version will have, but one expected improvement is that it will not require calibration.

Insulin Pens

Novo is on track to release a faster version of their Novolog for type 1 and 2 diabetes. The new version is expected to improve post-meal glucose levels by combining a short-acting insulin and two well-known excipients, a vitamin and an amino acid. Lilly also has a new basal insulin, Basaglar, which was just approved by the FDA and should be available before the end of the year.

Other New Diabetes Treatments

Combination drugs will continue to be the focus for the drug companies in 2016. Sanofi filed a new drug application last fall for its GLP-1 agonist Lyxumia (lixisenatide) and once that is approved, experts expect approval for combination drug Lixilan (Lyxumia+Lantus) to follow. Novo Nordisk also has a combination drug, Xultophy, a blend of GLP-1 agonist Victoza and their new basal insulin Tresiba, expected to hit the market later this year.

In addition to these new combo drugs, a new nasal glucagon is coming soon. Eli Lilly and Company acquired the rights to Locemia’s novel nasal glucagon that is reported to be easier to carry and use. Lilly is expected to file for approval for this device early this year.

If you have questions regarding diabetes, insulin pump supplies 0r blood glucose testing supplies, the experts at Focus Express Mail Pharmacy will happily answer them. Contact us at 1-866-403-6287 or visit www.focuspharmacy.com

When choosing an insulin pump infusion set, there are many factors to consider. Here are tips to choose what’s right for you based on your unique needs.

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Choosing an infusion set is an important decision if you’re living with diabetes and using an insulin pump to control it. Most insulin pumps require an infusion set to deliver insulin to the body. It consists of thin plastic tubing, a cannula and a plastic connector that joins the tubing and cannula together. Infusion sets come in many different styles, each suited to meet an individual’s unique needs.

Below are a few differences to be aware of when making your selection.

Teflon vs Steel Cannula.

A Teflon or “soft” cannula is a thin, flexible needle and is a popular choice given its comfort and ability to remain inserted for up to 72 hours. On the other hand, a steel cannula is a thin metal needle and can only stay in place for up to 48 hours. However, despite the flexibility and comfort of a soft cannula, it can also lead to kinking, which disrupts the flow of insulin into the body. This can potentially not be detected, which can be deadly. Therefore, users of soft cannulas need to know how to troubleshoot immediately if kinking occurs. Steel cannulas, however, are durable and will not kink. Despite this feature, the cannulas can cause discomfort during movement or physical activity.

Insertion Methods

There are two options for inserting a cannula, manual or with an insertion device. The manual method is useful for people wanting to control the speed of insertion. However, many prefer using an insertion device, which is helpful for people with arthritis, Parkinson disease, or any other condition that affects fine motor skills. Insertion devices also make it easier for insertion into certain parts of the body such as the buttocks or the back of the arm. Both insertion methods work effectively, so it is entirely up to the user.

Infusion sets also come in two insertion angle styles. There is straight or angled. Each offers advantages and disadvantages. Straight infusion sets allow for shorter needles, however, shorter needles can become dislodged more easily. Angled infusion sets are more popular among people who are active, but the needle is longer, which may be less appealing to some individuals.

Site Selection

Different areas of the body absorb insulin at similar rates. However, there can be slight variations from one body area to another. For most people, the most comfortable place to insert an infusion set is the abdominal area. Other options include the outer thighs, backs of the arms, hips and buttocks. When selecting an infusion site, it is a best practice to avoid areas with less fat and places where the infusion set might be constricted. For children, the buttocks seem to be one of the most comfortable infusion sites. Also, because a child cannot see this area, it is less likely that they will tamper with or remove the infusion set.

In addition to choosing the right site, it’s important to ensure proper infusion site care, which is essential for preventing infections. Cleanliness is critical, so start with washing your hands and the area of insertion. Despite impeccable site care, infections can still occur. At the first sign of infection, contact your healthcare provider immediately.

Special Considerations

When choosing the infusion set right for you, there are several other items to take into consideration. Some manufacturers’ pumps are compatible only with their own infusion set systems, while others are compatible with a variety of product lines. This feature may impact your final selection, so be sure to check first. Also, you might want to contact your insurance company because coverage on different types of sets may vary.

If you have any questions, the experts at Focus Express Mail Pharmacy are here to help! The experienced staff at Focus Express Mail Pharmacy have been assisting people with diabetes for years and are available to help answer your questions about diabetes, insulin pumps and insulin pump supplies.

Call us today at 1-866-403-6287 or visit us www.FocusPharmacy.com.

Read all about how breastfeeding your child might help you avoid Type 2 diabetes after giving birth.

 

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You’ve probably already heard all about the benefits breastfeeding provides newborns, but did you know the benefits don’t stop with your baby? If you suffered from gestational diabetes during pregnancy, new studies show that breastfeeding can actually help you too!

Breastfeeding Study’s Promising Findings

Researchers discovered that moms with previously-diagnosed gestational diabetes who breastfed for two or more months after their baby’s birth had lowered odds of later developing type 2 diabetes. Even better news? The longer the women breast-fed, the lower the odds became.

It’s important to note that the study didn’t reveal breastfeeding actually caused a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes; it simply found a link between the two. The research team followed nearly a thousand women two years after they experienced gestational diabetes and childbirth. Almost 12 percent of them developed type 2 diabetes, with those who exclusively breast-fed having a 54% lower risk than those that did not breastfeed at all. Those who fed their babies even some breastmilk in addition to formula still reduced their odds by a third compared to those feeding formula only.

The length of time the moms breastfed mattered too. Those who breastfed between two and 10 months had half the risk of developing diabetes, with those breastfeeding more than 10 months showing an even further reduced risk.

How Breastfeeding Affects your Body

All these results and percents show that breastfeeding can yield benefits for those moms who had gestational diabetes, but how exactly does it work in the body? Lactating gives the body’s insulin-producing cells a rest since they don’t have to make so much insulin in order to lower blood glucose. According to the study’s lead researcher, breastfeeding uses up glucose and fat because the blood transfers those nutrients to the breast tissue to facilitate milk production. He likens breastfeeding to giving the body a recovery period and providing a reset for the body’s metabolism after the metabolic chaos of pregnancy subsides.

Sometimes women with complications such as gestational diabetes find it difficult to focus on breastfeeding or they have other complications that make it difficult. Finding support from a physician or lactation consultant can be essential to successful breastfeeding. Remember that other lifestyle factors can reduce future risk for diabetes, too. These include weight loss, increased activity, and dietary changes.

Use the Resources Available to You

When you have questions about diabetes prevention and management, look no further than the trained experts at Focus Express Mail Pharmacy. Let them answer your questions about not only diabetes, but insulin pumps and insulin pump supplies as well. Learn more at www.focuspharmacy.com or call 1-866-403-6287.

 

When you’re living with diabetes, it’s always a good idea to have a first aid kit handy in the event of an emergency. Here’s what you need:

 first aid kit

Always having a first aid kit prepared, isn’t pessimistic. It’s smart, especially if you are living with diabetes. A well-stocked first-aid kit is easy to put together and will prove useful in both minor and major emergencies.

We recommend keeping your first aid kit in a room you spend a lot of time in or a place that is in easy reach. However, bathrooms, with all their heat and humidity, are not a good storage location.

To get started, first, select a waterproof container to hold the supplies and pack in the basics such as:

  • Aspirin, which is crucial for anyone suffering a heart attack. Baby aspirin is chewable which allows the medicine to work faster.
  • Wound care products such as a saline solution, helpful for cleaning any wounds prone to bacteria, dirt and debris. This is particularly important for people with diabetes, who may be more susceptible to infections.
  • Antibiotic Ointments, bandages and gloves. Be mindful of allergies. If anyone in your family is allergic to a certain product, like latex, stock non-latex gloves and bandages in your kit
  • Diabetes essentials such as a blood glucose meter, injective pen needles and insulin syringes. Even extra meter batteries can be included.
  • A list of emergency phone numbers to places like your doctor’s office and your local poison control office

You can find a full list of all recommended items, including diabetes specific ones and even some first aid tips here.

It’s important to keep in mind some extra precautions for diabetes related contents. You cannot store insulin in a first aid kit because it must be refrigerated. But you can definitely stock other supplies like a backup meter, extra insulin pump infusion sets, and fast-acting glucose gels or tablets.

Don’t forget to keep your first aid kit items current. If you plan to stock your kit with any medications that can expire, it’s important to check them frequently; experts recommend doing so at least twice a year. Also, don’t forget to refill or replace items as you use them.

A first aid kit is the first step in preventative care, but if you do injure yourself, be sure to schedule a follow up appointment with your health care provider. First aid is essential, but it’s only the beginning of the healing process. Continued care will ensure your stay safe in the long run.

 If you’re living with diabetes, keep in mind it’s always a good idea to have a first aid kit.

And if you have any specific questions about diabetes, the experts at Focus Express Mail Pharmacy are here to help! We’ve been answering people’s questions about diabetes, insulin pumps and supplies for years. We can help you too.

Call us today at 1-866-403-6287 or visit us online, at www.FocusPharmacy.com

 

 

 

A clinical trial shows those with diabetes given the drug Jardiance were 38% less likely to die from a heart attack, stroke or other cardiovascular disease.

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It’s an unfortunate truth, but diabetes is one of the leading causes of cardiovascular diseases and stroke. In fact, people with Type 2 diabetes are five to eight times more likely to develop cardiovascular disease, and to suffer a fatal heart attack or stroke.

Good News

Until recently, there has been little progress made in developing a drug that could reduce this risk. Prospects are brighter however with the release of results from a clinical trial ordered by the Federal Drug Administration. The New England Journal of Medicine published results last month that showed individuals who were given the blood sugar-lowering drug Jardiance were 38% less likely to die as a result of a heart attack, stroke or other cardiovascular issue than those given a placebo.

Also, those taking Jardiance were 35% less likely to be hospitalized for heart failure than those who took the placebo. Both findings bode well for diabetes sufferers.

Significant, Surprising Results

The results are surprising to many in the medical community as previous drug trials have not had a significant impact on reducing death from cardiovascular disease and stroke for those with diabetes. The clinical trials sponsored by Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc. and Eli Lilly and Co., suggest that among diabetes patients with cardiovascular disease, 39 people would have to be treated to prevent one premature death. This “number-to-treat” ratio puts the drug’s effectiveness on the same level as cholesterol-lowering statins and maybe even ahead of blood pressure medications.

Jardiance reduces blood sugar in diabetes patients by helping eliminate it from their urine. In all, 8.3% of the people taking the placebo died of any cause during the course of the study, compared with 5.7% of the people taking Jardiance.

Bright Prospects

Although the findings of the study are surprising to many, it is encouraging to see progress made in reducing one of the leading causes of death for those with diabetes.

If you have questions about diabetes and diabetes supplies, the experts at Focus Express Mail Pharmacy are here to help! Visit our website at www.FocusPharmacy.com or call us at 1-866-403-6287.