The bolus-basal insulin injection regime for those living with diabetes works like your body should, but may not be a suitable fit for everyone.

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If you have insulin dependent diabetes, you’re very familiar with bolus insulin, the type of insulin that is short-acting, typically taken with meals. However, not as many people with diabetes are as familiar with the other kind, basal insulin or, for that matter,  the bolus-basal insulin regime. Read on to learn the difference between bolus and basal injections and why a bolus-basal routine might be right for you.

Continue Reading Bolus and Basal Injections and What You Need to Know

Recent research shows that women who eat a diet high in potatoes might have an increased risk of developing gestational diabetes.

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Potatoes seem to be on every menu and for good reason: The starchy tubers are cheap, nutritious and delicious. Although once only widely eaten in Europe, North America and eastern Europe, recent years have seen increases in consumption in the rest of the world, with China currently the largest producer, accounting for one-third of potatoes grown globally. So what’s the downside to the spud’s spread?

Continue Reading Potatoes, Pregnancy and Gestational Diabetes: What’s the Deal?

There are Diabetes apps to help you manage your diet, set up doctor’s appointment reminders and track your health.

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There really is an app for everything, including apps to help you manage your diabetes. From reminders about appointments to weight management tips and tracking your glucose levels, diabetes care has never been easier for those of us with smartphones.

Here are some of the best apps to help you manage your diabetes:

Continue Reading The Best Apps to Help You Manage Your Diabetes

It’s important to know what medications are safe to take when you have a cold or allergy symptoms if you’re a diabetes sufferer. Here are some tips.

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Cold and allergy season is here again! As someone with diabetes, careful consideration should be made before taking any over-the-counter medications for your cold or allergy. When you’re sick, your glucose levels are already affected, so it’s best to avoid certain medications that may make it worse.

Continue Reading Diabetes Tips for Cold and Allergy Season

Living with diabetes doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy your favorite holiday foods. There are plenty of diabetes friendly recipes if you want to enjoy a LATE or a VERY EARLY St. Patrick’s Day this year!

st patricks dayBetter late than never………Holiday’s celebrated with friends, family and special foods don’t have to be a problem if you suffer from diabetes. St. Patrick’s Day is a perfect example of when eating some holiday-inspired dishes can make for a special occasion. Here are some diabetes friendly recipes for celebrating “the wearing of the green!”

Continue Reading Diabetes Friendly Recipes for NEXT St. Patrick’s Day!!

Learn which commonly prescribed and over-the-counter drugs can cause dangerous interactions if you have diabetes.

 

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If you have diabetes and take other prescription and non-prescription drugs, it’s time to evaluate your medications. It’s very common for those with the condition to take other drugs in addition to their diabetes medications. When certain meds are mixed together, however, the result is not always a positive one. In fact, certain drug interactions can produce harmful reactions that end with a trip to the hospital. Though not inclusive, take a look at the following list of commonly-used drugs. If you are taking any of these medications, make sure you discuss their use with your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

Continue Reading Ten Medications to Discuss with Your Doctor Before Taking if You Have Diabetes

A group of researchers at Cornell University have recently discovered a probiotic that may be considered a new treatment for diabetes.

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What would your life be like if taking a simple pill could help you manage your diabetes? With the development of new research, this futuristic dream might be close to becoming a reality. Researchers at Cornell University have engineered a common strain of human gut bacteria called Lactobacillus to produce a hormone that releases insulin in response to food. This bacterium could either supplement or take over the work of insulin production from the pancreas.

Exciting Research Results

The new study, led by Cornell professor John March, claims that the engineered probiotic essentially rewires the body and reduces blood glucose levels. Professor March and his colleagues conducted tests of the bacterium on a group of diabetic rats with successful results.

Over a ninety-day period, the researchers discovered that the group of diabetic rats that received the probiotic, in the form of a pill, had blood glucose levels up to 30 percent lower than those that did not receive it.

Changing Cells

The team also discovered that the pill appeared to convert the rats’ intestinal cells, making them to behave in a similar way to pancreatic cells. This is important because in healthy people, pancreatic cells release insulin and regulate blood glucose levels. Professor March explains that the treatment is basically moving the job of glucose control from the pancreas to the upper intestine.

What It Means

This discovery is instrumental because probiotics are generally considered safe. Plus, they are already available on the market and the people who take them generally report no adverse side effects.

The next step for the team is to test higher doses of the probiotic in diabetic rats to determine if it can completely reverse the diabetic condition. If it’s successful, there is potential for the probiotic to be converted into a pill for human use, which can be used to treat both type one and type two diabetes. Ultimately the goal would be for individuals to take the pill to help them manage their condition without the need for insulin injections. While this research is still in its infancy, it’s initial success provides much hope that better, less invasive treatment of diabetes is on the way.

If you have questions regarding diabetes medications, insulin pumps, or glucose testing  supplies , the experts at Focus Express Mail Pharmacy are here to help! Call us today at 1-866-403-6287 or visit us online at www.FocusPharmacy.com.

 

 

When choosing an insulin pump infusion set, there are many factors to consider. Here are tips to choose what’s right for you based on your unique needs.

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Choosing an infusion set is an important decision if you’re living with diabetes and using an insulin pump to control it. Most insulin pumps require an infusion set to deliver insulin to the body. It consists of thin plastic tubing, a cannula and a plastic connector that joins the tubing and cannula together. Infusion sets come in many different styles, each suited to meet an individual’s unique needs.

Below are a few differences to be aware of when making your selection.

Teflon vs Steel Cannula.

A Teflon or “soft” cannula is a thin, flexible needle and is a popular choice given its comfort and ability to remain inserted for up to 72 hours. On the other hand, a steel cannula is a thin metal needle and can only stay in place for up to 48 hours. However, despite the flexibility and comfort of a soft cannula, it can also lead to kinking, which disrupts the flow of insulin into the body. This can potentially not be detected, which can be deadly. Therefore, users of soft cannulas need to know how to troubleshoot immediately if kinking occurs. Steel cannulas, however, are durable and will not kink. Despite this feature, the cannulas can cause discomfort during movement or physical activity.

Insertion Methods

There are two options for inserting a cannula, manual or with an insertion device. The manual method is useful for people wanting to control the speed of insertion. However, many prefer using an insertion device, which is helpful for people with arthritis, Parkinson disease, or any other condition that affects fine motor skills. Insertion devices also make it easier for insertion into certain parts of the body such as the buttocks or the back of the arm. Both insertion methods work effectively, so it is entirely up to the user.

Infusion sets also come in two insertion angle styles. There is straight or angled. Each offers advantages and disadvantages. Straight infusion sets allow for shorter needles, however, shorter needles can become dislodged more easily. Angled infusion sets are more popular among people who are active, but the needle is longer, which may be less appealing to some individuals.

Site Selection

Different areas of the body absorb insulin at similar rates. However, there can be slight variations from one body area to another. For most people, the most comfortable place to insert an infusion set is the abdominal area. Other options include the outer thighs, backs of the arms, hips and buttocks. When selecting an infusion site, it is a best practice to avoid areas with less fat and places where the infusion set might be constricted. For children, the buttocks seem to be one of the most comfortable infusion sites. Also, because a child cannot see this area, it is less likely that they will tamper with or remove the infusion set.

In addition to choosing the right site, it’s important to ensure proper infusion site care, which is essential for preventing infections. Cleanliness is critical, so start with washing your hands and the area of insertion. Despite impeccable site care, infections can still occur. At the first sign of infection, contact your healthcare provider immediately.

Special Considerations

When choosing the infusion set right for you, there are several other items to take into consideration. Some manufacturers’ pumps are compatible only with their own infusion set systems, while others are compatible with a variety of product lines. This feature may impact your final selection, so be sure to check first. Also, you might want to contact your insurance company because coverage on different types of sets may vary.

If you have any questions, the experts at Focus Express Mail Pharmacy are here to help! The experienced staff at Focus Express Mail Pharmacy have been assisting people with diabetes for years and are available to help answer your questions about diabetes, insulin pumps and insulin pump supplies.

Call us today at 1-866-403-6287 or visit us www.FocusPharmacy.com.

People with Diabetes need to pay attention to their feet, especially in the winter, to prevent infections or worse. Here are some useful foot care tips.

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It goes without saying that people often pay little attention to their feet. But, for diabetes patients this oversight could lead to serious complications. Statistics show that 15-20% of people with diabetes end up in the hospital due to foot infections or foot ulcers. Either condition can lead to amputations, so foot care should be a very serious priority! Your health care provider should perform a complete foot exam at least annually; more often if you have existing problems.

Winter is especially a tough season for feet. Be proactive with these tips to keep them in tip top shape.

Inspect Daily

Take a few minutes in the morning or evening to give your feet a once over. Look for breaks in the skin, discharge, any noticeable color changes, or painful calluses and corns. Take a look at your socks and shoes also. Discoloration on your socks or stones in your shoes can mean problems. If you have sight issues or can’t easily see your feet, then ask a family member or friend to assist you.

Choose Good Footwear

Cold and wet winters can increase your chances of developing a foot ulcer. Having good shoes can help combat this. Choose footwear that is sturdy, has proper padding, and is warm. Don’t pick shoes that are too constricting as you don’t want to decrease blood flow to your feet. Wool socks are your friend in winter. Avoid materials that are synthetic or lock in moisture, opt instead for materials like wool that keep moisture at bay.

Keep Your Feet Dry

Wet feet are dangerous for diabetes patients because moisture can lead to bacteria growth. Make sure to always dry your feet well and change out of wet socks as soon as possible.

Trim Your Toenails

Toenails that are left untrimmed can create infections and ulcers. Your doctor can show you how to trim your toenails correctly. If you struggle with this task, seek professional help. You might be surprised to learn Medicare and other insurances may cover nail care as a part of diabetes treatment.

Don’t Burn Your Feet

In winter there’s more likelihood of being around hot implements like heating blankets, hot soaks, fireplaces or radiators. It’s imperative to be very careful if your feet are near these items. Getting even a second degree burn can be a major problem. If you do experience any kind of burn on your foot, contact your health care provider immediately and seek treatment.

Control Blood Sugar

Making sure your diabetes is under control is not only important for overall health but foot health as well. Poor diabetic care will often first appear through the feet. Consider a device like an insulin pump to manage your sugar levels.

If you have questions, the experts at Focus Express Mail Pharmacy are here for you!  Focus Express Mail Pharmacy has been helping people manage their diabetes for years. We can answer your questions about diabetes, insulin pumps, supplies, and more. Call us today at 1-866-403-6287.

 

Read all about how breastfeeding your child might help you avoid Type 2 diabetes after giving birth.

 

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You’ve probably already heard all about the benefits breastfeeding provides newborns, but did you know the benefits don’t stop with your baby? If you suffered from gestational diabetes during pregnancy, new studies show that breastfeeding can actually help you too!

Breastfeeding Study’s Promising Findings

Researchers discovered that moms with previously-diagnosed gestational diabetes who breastfed for two or more months after their baby’s birth had lowered odds of later developing type 2 diabetes. Even better news? The longer the women breast-fed, the lower the odds became.

It’s important to note that the study didn’t reveal breastfeeding actually caused a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes; it simply found a link between the two. The research team followed nearly a thousand women two years after they experienced gestational diabetes and childbirth. Almost 12 percent of them developed type 2 diabetes, with those who exclusively breast-fed having a 54% lower risk than those that did not breastfeed at all. Those who fed their babies even some breastmilk in addition to formula still reduced their odds by a third compared to those feeding formula only.

The length of time the moms breastfed mattered too. Those who breastfed between two and 10 months had half the risk of developing diabetes, with those breastfeeding more than 10 months showing an even further reduced risk.

How Breastfeeding Affects your Body

All these results and percents show that breastfeeding can yield benefits for those moms who had gestational diabetes, but how exactly does it work in the body? Lactating gives the body’s insulin-producing cells a rest since they don’t have to make so much insulin in order to lower blood glucose. According to the study’s lead researcher, breastfeeding uses up glucose and fat because the blood transfers those nutrients to the breast tissue to facilitate milk production. He likens breastfeeding to giving the body a recovery period and providing a reset for the body’s metabolism after the metabolic chaos of pregnancy subsides.

Sometimes women with complications such as gestational diabetes find it difficult to focus on breastfeeding or they have other complications that make it difficult. Finding support from a physician or lactation consultant can be essential to successful breastfeeding. Remember that other lifestyle factors can reduce future risk for diabetes, too. These include weight loss, increased activity, and dietary changes.

Use the Resources Available to You

When you have questions about diabetes prevention and management, look no further than the trained experts at Focus Express Mail Pharmacy. Let them answer your questions about not only diabetes, but insulin pumps and insulin pump supplies as well. Learn more at www.focuspharmacy.com or call 1-866-403-6287.