Children who don’t get enough sleep may be more likely to develop diabetes than kids who typically get enough shuteye, a UK study suggests and reports  by Lisa Rapaport of Reuters Health

That’s because each additional hour of sleep children get at night is associated with a lower body weight, more lean muscle mass and less accumulation of sugars in the blood, researchers report in Pediatrics. Obesity and elevated blood sugar are risk factors for type 2 diabetes, which happens when the body can’t properly use or make enough of the hormone insulin to convert blood sugar into energy.

Continue Reading Kids: Get Your Sleep!! Lack of Sleep Could Lead to Diabetes!

People with Diabetes need to pay attention to their feet, especially in the winter, to prevent infections or worse. Here are some useful foot care tips.

 foot care

It goes without saying that people often pay little attention to their feet. But, for diabetes patients this oversight could lead to serious complications. Statistics show that 15-20% of people with diabetes end up in the hospital due to foot infections or foot ulcers. Either condition can lead to amputations, so foot care should be a very serious priority! Your health care provider should perform a complete foot exam at least annually; more often if you have existing problems.

Winter is especially a tough season for feet. Be proactive with these tips to keep them in tip top shape.

Inspect Daily

Take a few minutes in the morning or evening to give your feet a once over. Look for breaks in the skin, discharge, any noticeable color changes, or painful calluses and corns. Take a look at your socks and shoes also. Discoloration on your socks or stones in your shoes can mean problems. If you have sight issues or can’t easily see your feet, then ask a family member or friend to assist you.

Choose Good Footwear

Cold and wet winters can increase your chances of developing a foot ulcer. Having good shoes can help combat this. Choose footwear that is sturdy, has proper padding, and is warm. Don’t pick shoes that are too constricting as you don’t want to decrease blood flow to your feet. Wool socks are your friend in winter. Avoid materials that are synthetic or lock in moisture, opt instead for materials like wool that keep moisture at bay.

Keep Your Feet Dry

Wet feet are dangerous for diabetes patients because moisture can lead to bacteria growth. Make sure to always dry your feet well and change out of wet socks as soon as possible.

Trim Your Toenails

Toenails that are left untrimmed can create infections and ulcers. Your doctor can show you how to trim your toenails correctly. If you struggle with this task, seek professional help. You might be surprised to learn Medicare and other insurances may cover nail care as a part of diabetes treatment.

Don’t Burn Your Feet

In winter there’s more likelihood of being around hot implements like heating blankets, hot soaks, fireplaces or radiators. It’s imperative to be very careful if your feet are near these items. Getting even a second degree burn can be a major problem. If you do experience any kind of burn on your foot, contact your health care provider immediately and seek treatment.

Control Blood Sugar

Making sure your diabetes is under control is not only important for overall health but foot health as well. Poor diabetic care will often first appear through the feet. Consider a device like an insulin pump to manage your sugar levels.

If you have questions, the experts at Focus Express Mail Pharmacy are here for you!  Focus Express Mail Pharmacy has been helping people manage their diabetes for years. We can answer your questions about diabetes, insulin pumps, supplies, and more. Call us today at 1-866-403-6287.

 

Read all about how breastfeeding your child might help you avoid Type 2 diabetes after giving birth.

 

 breastfeeding 2

You’ve probably already heard all about the benefits breastfeeding provides newborns, but did you know the benefits don’t stop with your baby? If you suffered from gestational diabetes during pregnancy, new studies show that breastfeeding can actually help you too!

Breastfeeding Study’s Promising Findings

Researchers discovered that moms with previously-diagnosed gestational diabetes who breastfed for two or more months after their baby’s birth had lowered odds of later developing type 2 diabetes. Even better news? The longer the women breast-fed, the lower the odds became.

It’s important to note that the study didn’t reveal breastfeeding actually caused a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes; it simply found a link between the two. The research team followed nearly a thousand women two years after they experienced gestational diabetes and childbirth. Almost 12 percent of them developed type 2 diabetes, with those who exclusively breast-fed having a 54% lower risk than those that did not breastfeed at all. Those who fed their babies even some breastmilk in addition to formula still reduced their odds by a third compared to those feeding formula only.

The length of time the moms breastfed mattered too. Those who breastfed between two and 10 months had half the risk of developing diabetes, with those breastfeeding more than 10 months showing an even further reduced risk.

How Breastfeeding Affects your Body

All these results and percents show that breastfeeding can yield benefits for those moms who had gestational diabetes, but how exactly does it work in the body? Lactating gives the body’s insulin-producing cells a rest since they don’t have to make so much insulin in order to lower blood glucose. According to the study’s lead researcher, breastfeeding uses up glucose and fat because the blood transfers those nutrients to the breast tissue to facilitate milk production. He likens breastfeeding to giving the body a recovery period and providing a reset for the body’s metabolism after the metabolic chaos of pregnancy subsides.

Sometimes women with complications such as gestational diabetes find it difficult to focus on breastfeeding or they have other complications that make it difficult. Finding support from a physician or lactation consultant can be essential to successful breastfeeding. Remember that other lifestyle factors can reduce future risk for diabetes, too. These include weight loss, increased activity, and dietary changes.

Use the Resources Available to You

When you have questions about diabetes prevention and management, look no further than the trained experts at Focus Express Mail Pharmacy. Let them answer your questions about not only diabetes, but insulin pumps and insulin pump supplies as well. Learn more at www.focuspharmacy.com or call 1-866-403-6287.

 

A clinical trial shows those with diabetes given the drug Jardiance were 38% less likely to die from a heart attack, stroke or other cardiovascular disease.

 research

It’s an unfortunate truth, but diabetes is one of the leading causes of cardiovascular diseases and stroke. In fact, people with Type 2 diabetes are five to eight times more likely to develop cardiovascular disease, and to suffer a fatal heart attack or stroke.

Good News

Until recently, there has been little progress made in developing a drug that could reduce this risk. Prospects are brighter however with the release of results from a clinical trial ordered by the Federal Drug Administration. The New England Journal of Medicine published results last month that showed individuals who were given the blood sugar-lowering drug Jardiance were 38% less likely to die as a result of a heart attack, stroke or other cardiovascular issue than those given a placebo.

Also, those taking Jardiance were 35% less likely to be hospitalized for heart failure than those who took the placebo. Both findings bode well for diabetes sufferers.

Significant, Surprising Results

The results are surprising to many in the medical community as previous drug trials have not had a significant impact on reducing death from cardiovascular disease and stroke for those with diabetes. The clinical trials sponsored by Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc. and Eli Lilly and Co., suggest that among diabetes patients with cardiovascular disease, 39 people would have to be treated to prevent one premature death. This “number-to-treat” ratio puts the drug’s effectiveness on the same level as cholesterol-lowering statins and maybe even ahead of blood pressure medications.

Jardiance reduces blood sugar in diabetes patients by helping eliminate it from their urine. In all, 8.3% of the people taking the placebo died of any cause during the course of the study, compared with 5.7% of the people taking Jardiance.

Bright Prospects

Although the findings of the study are surprising to many, it is encouraging to see progress made in reducing one of the leading causes of death for those with diabetes.

If you have questions about diabetes and diabetes supplies, the experts at Focus Express Mail Pharmacy are here to help! Visit our website at www.FocusPharmacy.com or call us at 1-866-403-6287.

 

 

 

 

Learn all about newly-discovered risk factors for developing Type 2 diabetes.

 medications

Studies on diabetes continue to produce new information for treatment and prevention. Recent research has uncovered even more risk factors for developing Type 2 diabetes, a disease that afflicts tens of millions of people in the U.S. alone. In addition to already-known risk factors including family history, obesity, and lack of physical activity, there are four additional factors to consider. As always, be sure to discuss these factors with your doctor before making changes to medications or eating habits.

Vitamin A Deficiencies

Research completed earlier this year led scientists to believe that a vitamin A deficiency may be linked to developing Type 2 diabetes. There are actually two types of vitamin A; the first is preformed (known as retinol) and is found in fish, poultry, meat, and dairy. Pro-vitamin A (known as beta-carotene), is found in fruits and veggies. Both types play a vital role in helping cell growth and maintaining a healthy immune system and healthy vision. Findings also suggest that synthetic forms of this essential vitamin might help reverse Type 2 diabetes, something definitely to be researched further.

Statin Use

Statins are drugs often used to lower cholesterol. Their use is also one of the latest risk factors for developing diabetes. In fact, one study showed that statin use could increase the risk for diabetes by up to 46%. It should be noted that though this study included a large sample size, it was made up only Caucasian men, meaning the findings might differ in women and people of other ethnicities. The results, however, should prompt caution when taking this type of medication.

Sugary-Drink Consumption

Sugar-filled drinks get a bad rap, and that may be for good reason. Their consumption has actually been linked to an 18% increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes. It’s not just soda pop you may need to steer clear of; fruit juice and artificially sweetened drinks are culprits too. High consumption is defined as 250 ml or about 8 oz. per day, a guideline to keep in mind when cracking open that next can of pop.

Low Birth Weight

A separate study at Harvard became the first to explore the effect of prenatal and postnatal factors in regards to developing diabetes. When it came to birth weight and lifestyle, it was determined that a low birth weight and living an unhealthy lifestyle were each associated with a higher risk for getting diabetes. Together, though, the two risk factors painted an even grimmer picture. About 18% of Type 2 diabetes cases were attributed to a low birth weight and an unhealthy lifestyle.

 

As more and more risk factors for diabetes are discovered, you’ll likely have questions about diabetes prevention and management. Let the trained experts at Focus Express Mail Pharmacy help answer your questions about not only diabetes, but insulin pumps and insulin pump supplies as well. Learn more at www.FocusPharmacy.com or call 1-866-403-6287.

 

A new study explores whether antibiotic usage increases the risk for developing Type 2 diabetes.

 

 antibiotics

A recent study in Denmark regarding antibiotic use and diabetes has created quite a buzz. Researchers found that in the years prior to their diagnosis, people with Type 2 diabetes took more antibiotics than those without it. This, of course, doesn’t prove that antibiotics cause the disease, but it still might make more people question their usage of such medication.

Frequent Use in America

Classified as “medicines used to treat infections and diseases caused by bacteria,” antibiotics are said to be prescribed to four out of five Americans each year. The aforementioned study showed that those with Type 2 diabetes were overexposed to antibiotics when compared to those without, not just before their diagnoses, but afterward as well. Researchers’ findings showed that taking an antibiotic of any type increased patients’ likelihood of getting a diabetes diagnosis by 50 percent if they had filled five or more prescriptions.

It remains unclear if the higher risk is because diabetes might develop over time, increasing the risk of infections (and the need for antibiotics) before a person is even diagnosed with diabetes. It could also be that the risk for diabetes increases if a person has repeated infections or exposure to antibiotics.

Animal Study Findings

When researched in animals, it has been found that antibiotics affect sugar and fat metabolism and also alters gut bacteria. Since there is ongoing speculation that gut flora and antibiotics could be linked to how the body metabolizes sugar and the development of diabetes, the findings of the Denmark study haven’t necessarily surprised many. Because diabetes is increasing in incidence globally and remains a challenge in the health care world, further studies will be made into how exactly antibiotic use corresponds with the disease.

What It Means

The primary takeaway is that anyone — with or without diabetes — should always be cautious when prescribed an antibiotic. Only take them when necessary and always under the guidance of your physician. As you continue on your journey of managing your diabetes, you’ll likely have questions about your insulin pump and other diabetes supplies. Let the trained experts at Focus Express Mail Pharmacy help. We have over 50 years of combined experience helping people just like you live life with diabetes fully. Check us out at www.focuspharmacy.com or call 1-866-403-6287.

 

As someone with diabetes, there are a lot of plans to consider for your golden years.

 seniors

Taking care of your health is always a high priority when you have diabetes. As you age, your healthcare concerns should include planning the care you need in your later years. Preparing for your golden years takes some research, but luckily there are a lot of resources available to help.

Considering Long Term Care

One of the things you’ll want to consider when planning for care in your later years is long term care options. Long term care provides personal care for an extended period of time if you need assistance with eating, getting dressed, walking or any other number of everyday activities.

Most insurance, including Medicare, doesn’t cover the cost of long term care, so it’s a good idea to meet with a financial planner who can assess your financial situation and help you make the plans you’ll need. He or she may recommend long term care insurance and can discuss other options for covering the cost such as Medicaid, which can cover long term care expenses after your money runs out.

Part of your planning should also include discussing the future with your family. It’s best to begin these conversations early, before you are forced into making decisions because of an accident or illness. You should decide who you’d like to make healthcare and financial decisions for you if you become unable to do so, as well as discuss the long term care options you’ve decided on so everyone is on the same page.

 End of Life Planning

It’s not something that most people like to think about, but planning for what will happen after you pass on is a necessary part of planning for the future. You don’t want to wait until the last minute when costly mistakes are most likely.

The first thing you should do is make a plan for your estate. It’s essential to meet with an attorney who specializes in estate planning to draft the documents you need for your future. Part of this planning should include drafting a letter of instruction for family so they know all about the plans you’ve made.

You can also pre-plan for your funeral, taking the burden away from your family to make arrangements after your passing. Pre-planning final arrangements not only allows you to provide specifics about what you would like for the service, it also eliminates the financial and emotional stress of planning a funeral from your family.

If you have questions, the experts at Focus Express Mail Pharmacy are available to answer your questions regarding diabetes, insulin supplies and diabetes supplies. Contact us at 1-866-403-6287 or visit www.focuspharmacy.com.

 

 

Read about reversing Type 2 diabetes and find out if it’s possible for you.

reverse

If you or your loved one has just received a Type 2 Diabetes diagnosis, you might wonder if the disease is curable. Or you might ask, is it  at least reversible? The short answer is yes, but such a reversal of symptoms doesn’t happen overnight. It also requires a bit of commitment. Read on to learn more.

 Defining Type 2 Diabetes

Let’s take a look at just what it is you’re trying to reverse. Type 2 Diabetes affects how you metabolize sugar. When glucose levels in your body rise, your pancreas makes and releases a hormone called insulin. That insulin makes the sugar leave your blood and move to your cells so it can be used as energy. Once your blood sugar levels are back down in a healthy range, your pancreas no longer releases the insulin. In those with Type 2 Diabetes, however, the pancreas either doesn’t make enough insulin or the body is, for some reason, resistant to it. The glucose then builds up in the blood and causes diabetes symptoms including fatigue, infections, blurry vision, and excessive thirst.

Is Reversal Possible?

When discussing the diabetes reversal, it’s important to remember that, while possible, a lot depends on how long you’ve had it, how severe your case is, and even your genetic makeup. Reversal typically refers to managing the disease to the point where you can stop taking medication. It allows for the fact that you still need to manage your lifestyle in such a way that you can continue drug-free. The good news is it is often possible to accomplish this goal. Results of one study were most positive in those who were newly-diagnosed, without a severe case, and who lost the most weight. In fact, up to 20% of the people fitting this criteria were able to go off their medications altogether.

What it Takes to Reverse Diabetes

So, how did they go off diabetes medication? Or more importantly, how can you? Two factors have the greatest affect – physical activity and diet. In the study, successful participants exercised for 175 minutes each week, or 25 minutes each day. One fairly simple way to start incorporating more physical activity is by walking. It is free, requires no special equipment, and is effective. If you’re new to walking, just start slowly. Take a short walk and over time increase the distance and intensity of your walks.

When it comes to nutrition, the study participants who found success also limited their caloric intake to between 1,200 and 1,800 calories each day. Don’t just focus on the quantity of food you consume though; be sure to consider the types of foods you eat as well. If you hope to manage and even reverse the disease, you’ll need to incorporate healthy fats, fruits, veggies, whole grains, and lean protein into your diet. Limit your alcohol and sweets, and eat the same amount of carbs at each meal. You might find meal planning helps you maintain your commitment to healthy eating.

Those participants in the study who were able to stop taking diabetes meds also received counseling and education on their lifestyle changes. So don’t underestimate the value of learning more about your healthy lifestyle and talking with someone about the changes you’re making and how they’re affecting your daily life.

How We Can Help

As you embark on your journey to managing, or even reversing, your diabetes, you’ll likely have questions about your diabetes, your insulin pump, or other supplies. Let the trained experts at Focus Express Mail Pharmacy help. We have over 50 years of combined experience helping people just like you manage their diabetes. Check us out at www.FocusPharmacy.com or call, toll-free,  1-866-403-6287.

 

Studies indicate that a vegetarian diet encourages a healthy weight and also improves blood sugar control and insulin response for people with Diabetes

vegan diet and healthy eating for diabetes

 A vegetarian diet offers many health benefits for everyone. It promotes a healthy weight and decreases your risk of cardiovascular diseases. Studies indicate that for those managing diabetes, a vegetarian diet also improves blood sugar control and insulin response. There are a few different types of vegetarian diets but if you decide it’s right for you, you’ll find a vegetarian diet offers many delectable options to enjoy. Take a look at the recipes below and add them to your menu today.

  • The Crunch Time Veggie Wrap is as colorfully festive as it is tasty. The recipe only makes one serving so it is easy to create a quick lunch for work with just 28 carbs per serving.
  • If your taste buds are craving something a little sweeter, they will love a Beet, Carrot, and Apple Salad. With walnut halves nestled among parsley, this slaw-like salad is lovely enough to serve for a dinner party with only 112 calories per serving.
  • Sweet Pepper-Green Onion Quesadillas are a perfect comfort food and healthy at the same time because they only have 12 carbs. Whip them up on a busy weeknight and the whole family will run to the table.
  • This Jamaican Red Bean Soup is easy to make and with six servings you will have enough left over to pack for lunch the next day. It has an estimated glycemic load of 8 and packs a variety of yummy vegetables.
  • Try this Asparagus Polenta Bake for an elegant and healthy side dish. It is easy to make and brings five grams of protein. You will enjoy the flavorings of Portobello mushrooms and sun-dried tomatoes, as well.
  • This recipe for Vegetable Lasagna is another feast for the eyes and the tummy. Invite some friends over and enjoy this beautiful dish with only eight grams of fat per serving.

If you are considering changing to a vegetarian diet, it may be helpful to speak with a dietician who can help you create an eating plan that incorporates all the nutrients you need to maintain a healthy weight or lose weight. If your goal is to lose weight, it is important to stay within an appropriate calorie range.

We are available at Focus Express Mail Pharmacy to answer any questions you may have about diabetes, diabetes supplies or insulin pumps.

Call 1-866-403-6287 and let us help you today!

 

 

 

Learn more about pre-diabetes and lifestyle changes that you can make to improve your overall health and reduce your chance of getting diabetes.

When you think of pre-diabetes, just consider it a warning sign of sorts. It isn’t a guarantee you’ll later receive a diabetes diagnosis. In fact, it’s quite the opposite since it provides you the opportunity to make changes that will actually decrease your likelihood of getting Type 2 diabetes. Read on to learn what pre-diabetes is really all about.

 

What it Is

Just as the phrase implies, pre-diabetes simply means your glucose – or blood sugar – level is higher than the normal range, but does not yet fall in the diabetes range. Your body produces insulin, a hormone that helps control your blood sugar. In those with pre-diabetes, that process isn’t working as well as it should. Typically this means you aren’t making enough insulin after eating or that your body isn’t responding to insulin correctly. Some people call this borderline diabetes, but the bottom line is it can be an excellent wake-up call to remind you that without changes to your health, you may eventually be diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. But with those changes, you may be able to prevent diabetes altogether.

What it Means for You

The good news is that it’s not too late! Since having pre-diabetes is more like a red flag of sorts, it is possible to improve your health and prevent a Type 2 diabetes diagnosis. By taking care of your well-being and making necessary lifestyle changes, you greatly reduce your risk factors. This includes incorporating exercise and proper nutrition into your daily lifestyle. Try to work out for 30 minutes each day. Aim for aerobic exercise that increases your heart rate. Choose foods that mix lean meats, veggies and whole grains while skipping the sugars and starches. If you can maintain a healthy weight, you’ll also decrease your change of getting diabetes. In fact, losing even 5 -10 percent of your body weight can make a big difference.

Tests you Might Encounter

Having pre-diabetes also means you’ll likely need one or more of the tests described below to allow your healthcare provider to best chart your course of treatment if necessary.

An A1C test lets your physician know what your average blood sugar level was for the past few months. It’s quite painless and doesn’t require fasting or drinking a special liquid. Using this test, diabetes is diagnosed at an A1C of 6.5% or higher. Pre-diabetes is considered an A1C of 5.7 – 6.5%, and a normal result is anything less than 5.7%.

A Fasting Plasma Glucose (FPG) test determines your blood glucose level when fasting. That means you won’t be able to eat or drink anything other than water for eight hours prior to testing. Thankfully, the test is usually performed right away in the morning. Using the FPG test results, diabetes is labeled at 126 mg/dl or higher, while pre-diabetes is 100-125 mg/dl, and a normal reading is anything less than 100 mg/dl.

The Oral Glucose (OGTT) checks your blood glucose level before you drink a certain sweet drink as well as two hours after. It shows how your body processes the glucose. A result of 200 mg/dl after the two hours indicates diabetes, while pre-diabetes is 140 – 199 mg/dl, and a normal result is anything less than 140 mg/dl.

The final test, a Random (or Casual) Plasma Glucose test, is simply a blood check performed any time of the day when you have severe diabetes symptoms. You likely won’t be required to test this particular way while you have just a pre-diabetes diagnosis.

Where to Look for Assistance

You now know which blood glucose tests you might encounter, what pre-diabetes means for you, and how to use it as an opportunity to make changes to your health. However, you might still have questions about diabetes and diabetes supplies. The experts at Focus Express Mail Pharmacy can help! They’ve helped people manage diabetes for many years and have the answers when it comes to diabetes supplies and insulin pumps. Check them out at www.Focuspharmacy.com or call 1-866-403-6287.