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According to Reuters on 11/21/2018:

A global diabetes epidemic is fueling record demand for insulin, but tens of millions will not get the injections they need unless there is a dramatic improvement in access and affordability, a new study concludes.

Diabetes — which can lead to blindness, kidney failure, heart problems, neuropathic pain and amputations — now affects 9 percent of all adults worldwide, up from 5 percent in 1980.

The vast majority have Type 2 diabetes, the kind linked to obesity and lack of exercise, and cases are spreading particularly rapidly in the developing world as people adopt more Western, urban lifestyles.

Researchers said the amount of insulin needed to effectively treat Type 2 diabetes would rise by more than 20 percent over the next 12 years, but insulin would be beyond the reach of half of the 79 million Type 2 diabetics predicted to need it in 2030.

The shortfall is most acute in Africa, where the research team, led by Dr. Sanjay Basu from Stanford University, estimated that supply would have to rise sevenfold to treat at-risk patients who had reached the stage of requiring insulin to control their blood sugar. Their study was published Tuesday in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journal.

“These estimates suggest that current levels of insulin access are highly inadequate compared to projected need, particularly in Africa and Asia,” Basu said.

“Despite the U.N.’s commitment to treat noncommunicable diseases and ensure universal access to drugs for diabetes, across much of the world insulin is scarce and unnecessarily difficult for patients to access.”

 

Fewer cases of diabetes are being reported in recent years. However, the epidemic is not over!!

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The number of new diabetes cases being reported has declined for the fifth year straight. After decades of increases, this is a positive sign according to health care professionals. In 2014, 1.4 million people were diagnosed with diabetes, which is down from 1.7 million new cases reported in 2009. While the statistics are great news, they don’t mean the epidemic has ended.

Continue Reading Fewer People Are Being Diagnosed with Diabetes

Two top universities have teamed up to make important in-roads into finding a cure for Type 1 diabetes.

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What happens when researchers from two top universities team up? In this case, it means some very good news for Type I diabetes sufferers. Researchers from MIT’s David H. Koch Institute and the Harvard Stem Cell Institute along with several other institutions released news in early 2016 of research that may mean a cure for Type I diabetes is within reach. While the research is promising, the new technology is still in the early stages of testing.

Continue Reading A Major Breakthrough in Type 1 Diabetes Research

Learn which commonly prescribed and over-the-counter drugs can cause dangerous interactions if you have diabetes.

 

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If you have diabetes and take other prescription and non-prescription drugs, it’s time to evaluate your medications. It’s very common for those with the condition to take other drugs in addition to their diabetes medications. When certain meds are mixed together, however, the result is not always a positive one. In fact, certain drug interactions can produce harmful reactions that end with a trip to the hospital. Though not inclusive, take a look at the following list of commonly-used drugs. If you are taking any of these medications, make sure you discuss their use with your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

Continue Reading Ten Medications to Discuss with Your Doctor Before Taking if You Have Diabetes

A group of researchers at Cornell University have recently discovered a probiotic that may be considered a new treatment for diabetes.

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What would your life be like if taking a simple pill could help you manage your diabetes? With the development of new research, this futuristic dream might be close to becoming a reality. Researchers at Cornell University have engineered a common strain of human gut bacteria called Lactobacillus to produce a hormone that releases insulin in response to food. This bacterium could either supplement or take over the work of insulin production from the pancreas.

Exciting Research Results

The new study, led by Cornell professor John March, claims that the engineered probiotic essentially rewires the body and reduces blood glucose levels. Professor March and his colleagues conducted tests of the bacterium on a group of diabetic rats with successful results.

Over a ninety-day period, the researchers discovered that the group of diabetic rats that received the probiotic, in the form of a pill, had blood glucose levels up to 30 percent lower than those that did not receive it.

Changing Cells

The team also discovered that the pill appeared to convert the rats’ intestinal cells, making them to behave in a similar way to pancreatic cells. This is important because in healthy people, pancreatic cells release insulin and regulate blood glucose levels. Professor March explains that the treatment is basically moving the job of glucose control from the pancreas to the upper intestine.

What It Means

This discovery is instrumental because probiotics are generally considered safe. Plus, they are already available on the market and the people who take them generally report no adverse side effects.

The next step for the team is to test higher doses of the probiotic in diabetic rats to determine if it can completely reverse the diabetic condition. If it’s successful, there is potential for the probiotic to be converted into a pill for human use, which can be used to treat both type one and type two diabetes. Ultimately the goal would be for individuals to take the pill to help them manage their condition without the need for insulin injections. While this research is still in its infancy, it’s initial success provides much hope that better, less invasive treatment of diabetes is on the way.

If you have questions regarding diabetes medications, insulin pumps, or glucose testing  supplies , the experts at Focus Express Mail Pharmacy are here to help! Call us today at 1-866-403-6287 or visit us online at www.FocusPharmacy.com.

 

 

Read all about how breastfeeding your child might help you avoid Type 2 diabetes after giving birth.

 

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You’ve probably already heard all about the benefits breastfeeding provides newborns, but did you know the benefits don’t stop with your baby? If you suffered from gestational diabetes during pregnancy, new studies show that breastfeeding can actually help you too!

Breastfeeding Study’s Promising Findings

Researchers discovered that moms with previously-diagnosed gestational diabetes who breastfed for two or more months after their baby’s birth had lowered odds of later developing type 2 diabetes. Even better news? The longer the women breast-fed, the lower the odds became.

It’s important to note that the study didn’t reveal breastfeeding actually caused a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes; it simply found a link between the two. The research team followed nearly a thousand women two years after they experienced gestational diabetes and childbirth. Almost 12 percent of them developed type 2 diabetes, with those who exclusively breast-fed having a 54% lower risk than those that did not breastfeed at all. Those who fed their babies even some breastmilk in addition to formula still reduced their odds by a third compared to those feeding formula only.

The length of time the moms breastfed mattered too. Those who breastfed between two and 10 months had half the risk of developing diabetes, with those breastfeeding more than 10 months showing an even further reduced risk.

How Breastfeeding Affects your Body

All these results and percents show that breastfeeding can yield benefits for those moms who had gestational diabetes, but how exactly does it work in the body? Lactating gives the body’s insulin-producing cells a rest since they don’t have to make so much insulin in order to lower blood glucose. According to the study’s lead researcher, breastfeeding uses up glucose and fat because the blood transfers those nutrients to the breast tissue to facilitate milk production. He likens breastfeeding to giving the body a recovery period and providing a reset for the body’s metabolism after the metabolic chaos of pregnancy subsides.

Sometimes women with complications such as gestational diabetes find it difficult to focus on breastfeeding or they have other complications that make it difficult. Finding support from a physician or lactation consultant can be essential to successful breastfeeding. Remember that other lifestyle factors can reduce future risk for diabetes, too. These include weight loss, increased activity, and dietary changes.

Use the Resources Available to You

When you have questions about diabetes prevention and management, look no further than the trained experts at Focus Express Mail Pharmacy. Let them answer your questions about not only diabetes, but insulin pumps and insulin pump supplies as well. Learn more at www.focuspharmacy.com or call 1-866-403-6287.

 

What’s the link between weight, diabetes and poor sleep? Focus Express Mail Pharmacy explains.

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If you’ve been having trouble getting your Z’s, there might be a health reason? You see, many diabetes patients have trouble getting a good night’s rest, leaving them feeling drowsy and lethargic throughout the day.

Diabetes and sleep

Diabetes and sleep problems often are intertwined. For those not diagnosed with the condition, sleep deprivation can lead to insulin resistance, which then can develop into diabetes.

And diabetes, especially when it comes to high blood sugar, can be the culprit behind nighttime woes. High sugar levels cause frequent urination, which equals interrupted sleep at night. For those with diabetes, this means a vicious cycle of low energy from lack of sleep leading to poor diet choices, then poor rest due to the subsequent spike in blood sugar, and so on. If this sounds familiar, doctors recommend focusing on getting sugar levels under control.

Weight and sleep

According to WebMD, being overweight is one major risk factor for the development of Type 2 diabetes, and it also can negatively impact your quality of rest. Excess weight also can lead to sleep apnea. This disorder causes snoring and pauses in breathing, which leads to interrupted sleep and fatigue, worsening the side effects and severity of diabetes. If you have diabetes, snore, and often feel fatigued, it’s a good idea to schedule a time to see your doctor. If a sleep study determines that you do, in fact, have sleep apnea, treatment can include lifestyle changes or a mask or other device to facilitate nighttime breathing.

Bottom line

Those with diabetes need to be diligent about getting the proper amount of sleep–it’s just as important as diet, doctors say.  Although it’s generally accepted that the average amount of sleep needed is around 7.5 hours nightly, it varies from person to person, and can be as little as four or as many as 10 or more hours each night. The main determinant should be the amount of regular sleep that leads to the individual feeling rested.

Have questions? The experts at Focus Express Mail Pharmacy are available to answer your questions regarding diabetes, insulin supplies and diabetes supplies. Contact us at 1-866-403-6287 or visit www.focuspharmacy.com.

 

 

 

Scientists are working in many areas to prevent and cure diabetes. Here’s an update on three key areas of research.

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Now is one of the most exciting times in diabetes research. Scientists are working in many areas, and three key types of research – viruses, gut microbiome and inflammation – are getting a lot of attention lately. This research may have a significant impact on diabetes prevention and treatment down the road. Here is a little about what the scientists are doing.

Viruses

Recent studies have made strides in determining the connection between viruses and Type 1 Diabetes. Although access to pancreatic tissue from human donors is limited, groups like the Network for Pancreatic Organ Donors with Diabetes (nPOD) are taking the lead examining the impact of viruses by coordinating studies using the most up-to-date technology. Scientists are hopeful they will soon have more information on the relationship between viruses and diabetes, which they believe might lead to a simple vaccine to prevent the disease in many people.

Gut Microbiome

Did you know there is more bacteria living in your gut than there are cells in your body? Scientists have made great strides of late studying the impact of the bacteria living in our digestive tract on the development of our immune systems. Scientists have also been studying the foods we eat and how they impact various good and bad bacteria. By understanding which foods promote good bacterial growth and force out bad bacteria or fight viruses, treatments can be developed for autoimmune diseases and in the long run, even help in the fight to prevent diabetes.

Inflammation

Inflammation is a very broad term and isn’t a bad thing when it occurs in moderation. Inflammation is one of the body’s ways of responding to a germ attack by working with the immune system to ward off bacteria or a virus. However, in some cases inflammatory responses can react to things that aren’t invaders, like insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas, and trigger a chain reaction that can lead to sepsis, diabetes (both type 1 and type 2), heart disease and other health issues. Scientists are looking into ways to control inflammation (and preventing damage to the pancreas) without totally getting rid of the immune benefits of inflammation.

You can read more about these developments here. And remember, the experts at Focus Express Mail Pharmacy are available to answer your questions regarding diabetes, insulin supplies and diabetes supplies. Contact us at 1-866-403-6287 or visit www.focuspharmacy.com.

 

A clinical trial shows those with diabetes given the drug Jardiance were 38% less likely to die from a heart attack, stroke or other cardiovascular disease.

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It’s an unfortunate truth, but diabetes is one of the leading causes of cardiovascular diseases and stroke. In fact, people with Type 2 diabetes are five to eight times more likely to develop cardiovascular disease, and to suffer a fatal heart attack or stroke.

Good News

Until recently, there has been little progress made in developing a drug that could reduce this risk. Prospects are brighter however with the release of results from a clinical trial ordered by the Federal Drug Administration. The New England Journal of Medicine published results last month that showed individuals who were given the blood sugar-lowering drug Jardiance were 38% less likely to die as a result of a heart attack, stroke or other cardiovascular issue than those given a placebo.

Also, those taking Jardiance were 35% less likely to be hospitalized for heart failure than those who took the placebo. Both findings bode well for diabetes sufferers.

Significant, Surprising Results

The results are surprising to many in the medical community as previous drug trials have not had a significant impact on reducing death from cardiovascular disease and stroke for those with diabetes. The clinical trials sponsored by Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc. and Eli Lilly and Co., suggest that among diabetes patients with cardiovascular disease, 39 people would have to be treated to prevent one premature death. This “number-to-treat” ratio puts the drug’s effectiveness on the same level as cholesterol-lowering statins and maybe even ahead of blood pressure medications.

Jardiance reduces blood sugar in diabetes patients by helping eliminate it from their urine. In all, 8.3% of the people taking the placebo died of any cause during the course of the study, compared with 5.7% of the people taking Jardiance.

Bright Prospects

Although the findings of the study are surprising to many, it is encouraging to see progress made in reducing one of the leading causes of death for those with diabetes.

If you have questions about diabetes and diabetes supplies, the experts at Focus Express Mail Pharmacy are here to help! Visit our website at www.FocusPharmacy.com or call us at 1-866-403-6287.

 

 

 

 

Learn all about newly-discovered risk factors for developing Type 2 diabetes.

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Studies on diabetes continue to produce new information for treatment and prevention. Recent research has uncovered even more risk factors for developing Type 2 diabetes, a disease that afflicts tens of millions of people in the U.S. alone. In addition to already-known risk factors including family history, obesity, and lack of physical activity, there are four additional factors to consider. As always, be sure to discuss these factors with your doctor before making changes to medications or eating habits.

Vitamin A Deficiencies

Research completed earlier this year led scientists to believe that a vitamin A deficiency may be linked to developing Type 2 diabetes. There are actually two types of vitamin A; the first is preformed (known as retinol) and is found in fish, poultry, meat, and dairy. Pro-vitamin A (known as beta-carotene), is found in fruits and veggies. Both types play a vital role in helping cell growth and maintaining a healthy immune system and healthy vision. Findings also suggest that synthetic forms of this essential vitamin might help reverse Type 2 diabetes, something definitely to be researched further.

Statin Use

Statins are drugs often used to lower cholesterol. Their use is also one of the latest risk factors for developing diabetes. In fact, one study showed that statin use could increase the risk for diabetes by up to 46%. It should be noted that though this study included a large sample size, it was made up only Caucasian men, meaning the findings might differ in women and people of other ethnicities. The results, however, should prompt caution when taking this type of medication.

Sugary-Drink Consumption

Sugar-filled drinks get a bad rap, and that may be for good reason. Their consumption has actually been linked to an 18% increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes. It’s not just soda pop you may need to steer clear of; fruit juice and artificially sweetened drinks are culprits too. High consumption is defined as 250 ml or about 8 oz. per day, a guideline to keep in mind when cracking open that next can of pop.

Low Birth Weight

A separate study at Harvard became the first to explore the effect of prenatal and postnatal factors in regards to developing diabetes. When it came to birth weight and lifestyle, it was determined that a low birth weight and living an unhealthy lifestyle were each associated with a higher risk for getting diabetes. Together, though, the two risk factors painted an even grimmer picture. About 18% of Type 2 diabetes cases were attributed to a low birth weight and an unhealthy lifestyle.

 

As more and more risk factors for diabetes are discovered, you’ll likely have questions about diabetes prevention and management. Let the trained experts at Focus Express Mail Pharmacy help answer your questions about not only diabetes, but insulin pumps and insulin pump supplies as well. Learn more at www.FocusPharmacy.com or call 1-866-403-6287.